By

Socials Final

 

My participation and proficiency in the TALONS Socials Canada from 1815-1914 Unit has been very good. I am effective member of the class and I positively contribute to the learning environment by sharing my knowledge and opinions. I have a complete and thorough understanding of the material covered in class, I have met all the PLOs set out by the Ministry of Education and in many cases I believe I have exceeded these recommendations. I have a good understanding of major events and influential people that had a part in shaping Canada’s identity from 1815-1914 and I have an increased awareness of how this identity has changed and evolved into that of present day Canada. Over the course of this unit I have also been able to gather enough information and understanding to form my own view of Canada’s identity. Through this process I have learned about the differences in the lives and cultures of people in various ethnic groups, how these groups interacted with one another and the structure and narratives of the Canadian government pre, during and post confederation as well as in the past 50 years. Reflecting on the past year of Social Studies, I believe I have thoroughly met the expectations set out by the Ministry of Education and I am fully meeting or exceeding in the areas of engagement and participation, documents of learning, reflections and summative assessments.

 

 

Early on in the school year, I conducted my Eminent Person Project on a Canadian Bagpiper and during the development of this project I met all the PLOs in section A through my research, synthesis and presentation on Night of the Notables. Through this process I also began to meet PLO B3 which relates to the influence of immigration on Canadian society from 1815-1914. The large volume of Scottish immigrants to early Canada is the main reason why, to this day, there are still such large and pronounced Scottish communities and regularly celebrated traditions.

 

In the previous term I gained an in-depth understanding of the life of Sir Alexander Campbell as well as the lives of people who shared his place in society in terms of gender, race and class. I achieved this through my participation in the Canadian Confederation Role Play and my research regarding his life and legacy. I also learned about the colonization, settlement and governmental reform that led to the confederation of Canada through class discussions, reading articles and conducting my own research. For a more detailed reflection on my prior learning as of the Socials Midterm you can check out my blog post.

 

This term I definitely met the goal I set in my Midterm to learn more about PLOs B1-B4 and in this section is where I believe I did some of my best work. An example of this is my work in regards to PLO B2 or evaluating the impact of interactions between Aboriginal peoples and European explorers and settlers. After discussing the topic, specifically residential schools, reserves and the Indian Act, in class I wrote a blog post about the ways interactions between Aboriginal people and the governments of Canada and New Zealand differ. After conducting research and talking to some of my friends from New Zealand, I formed the opinion that, somewhere along its history, New Zealand did something right which dramatically increased the historical understanding and integration of the Maori culture. I then conducted more research and wrote my Op-Ed relating to PLO B2 on the action New Zealand has taken to improve its countries aboriginal relations and how I believe Canada could and should do the same. However, I think the best part of this process was the fact that a week or two after I finished my Op-Ed, Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission Published their report and recommendation for actions the Government of Canada can take to improve Aboriginal relations and address and reconcile the past.

 

I gained a thorough understanding of PLOs C1-C4 as well as an understanding of modern politics and the political narratives of the current political parties. Through class discussions and readings about the National Policy, CPR Railway and westward expansion I built on my understanding of Canadian politics from 1815-1914 that I gained through the Confederation Role Play in the previous term.  I developed my knowledge on this topic and PLOs D and E further during the final Social Studies unit on modern political economy. By analysing the political narratives of the past and modern governmental parties I was able to make connections and get a sense of the recurring patterns in Canadian Politics. After in class discussions, debates and research in regards to the current political parties narratives for the upcoming federal election, I was able to identify a personally relevant political narrative and objectively compare the political parties’ platforms to find a match. I wrote my blog post about my political narrative of ensuring jobs for young Canadians and compared the information I had found in a mind map. In class we also discussed the role of the environment in modern politics and made a mind map about the four main political parties’ narratives in regards to the environment.

 

Additionally, I have been participating in committee work within TALONS and within my band which shares many parallels to the structure of a democratic government and the process of decision making and conflict resolution that occurs within this type of government. I also had my Op-Ed for my EIIP Group published in a local paper. This term I developed my ability to synthesis and process large amounts of information and create my own conclusions or opinions. I believe this is evident in my blog posts, op-ed and contribution to in class discussions. My goal for improvement for next year is to learn to use more types of media to effectively represent and collect documents of my learning.

 

 

I have many thoughtful and useful documents of learning that I put a considerable amount of effort into during the course of the socials unit. They are of various media including my paper notes, my electronic blog posts, my spoken final address, my Op-Ed and my Socials Final. I take notes or mind maps on a regular basis and I believe that they are like sub or supporting documents of learning in the sense that they help me produce higher quality blog posts, help me draw connections between events and cement important ideas or concepts.

 

When it comes to summative assessments and reflections I like to group them into the same category because I believe that they lead to a similar, if not the same, end product. Summative assessments or tests, like a thoughtful and honest reflection, will give you an answer to the basic questions “What do I know or understand?” and “what do I need to improve on or learn more about?” Both are, in my opinion, effective forms of assessment and necessary in the education system as it is now. In terms of my own reflection and performance in regards to summative assessments throughout this unit, I believe this social studies midterm assignment, in conjunction with my blog posts and in class role play, is a prime example of my reflection abilities and a good piece of work to be assessed or graded. For this assignment I am reflecting on my own performance compared to the guidelines provided by the Ministry of Education, what I was able to grasp and what I would like to learn more about. Most importantly I am also reflecting on how I developed an understanding of concepts, why they are important concepts and what I still strive to understand.

By

A Lesson from Down Under

The government’s interactions with first nation’s people in Canada have never been good, there was conflict even before Canada became a country of its own and the tension and mistrust as a result of these conflicts has only compacted and become more tangled and twisted over our nation’s history. From the treaties, reserves and residential schools of the past to the missing and murdered aboriginal women and police brutality towards modern day first nations, it is obvious that something isn’t working. It seems like every week there are more articles analyzing and reporting on the losses and irreconcilable damage done to the first nation’s culture and people. Based on the past the future looks pretty grim. We shouldn’t forget the past but I believe that it is time to turn our attention towards what we can do to create a Canada with an integrated aboriginal perspective in the areas of government, the arts and our collective culture.

 

In 1867, nine years before Canada’s Indian Act was brought into effect, New Zealand had already established a parliamentary government with reserved seats for the Māori, the native people of New Zealand. The Māori population faced similar traumas to the first nations people of Canada including, disease, land disputes and social upheaval and like Canada’s first nations their numbers dropped exponentially. However, in the early 1900s their population began to recover, efforts were made to increase their standing in New Zealand society and their culture experienced a revival.  Much of this is due to the New Zealand’s government’s continued promotion of Māori culture and historical understanding for every New Zealand citizen, no matter their background. Seats are still reserved in the legislative parliament to ensure that Māori values are taken into account and that the Māori have the ability to veto any bill directly relating to their culture. Māori culture is a big part of New Zealand’s culture; traditional art and dances like the Haka are common practices for all new Zealanders. Unlike Canada’s first nation’s traditional languages, Māori is an official language of New Zealand. It is used in everyday conversation and also taught in schools.

 

Canada may be prized for its multiculturalism and acceptance of diversity but it seems as though we have forgotten about the people that were here first. We need to learn from our mistakes and New Zealand’s successes. By following New Zealand’s example and creating more opportunities for all Canadians to become educated and take part in aboriginal cultural teachings we could help to improve understanding of and reconcile our country’s past.

By

Help Canadians Help Themselves

The political party that is elected in the upcoming election will likely still be the party that is in power when I am going to university, moving out and attempting to start a life of my own. For this reason, if I could vote, I would want to choose a party that best meets my political narrative of “ensuring jobs for young Canadians.” At first this may not seem very important when compared to many of the popular political narratives mentioned in the current ad campaigns and informational booklets; however, I believe it is even more important than creating affordable housing (Liberals), increasing the minimum wage to $15 (NDP) or a Universal Childcare Benefit (Conservatives). I want to be able to find a job when I graduate that will allow me to pay off any debt I may have and live a comfortable lifestyle.  If myself and others are able to find good jobs that allow us to lead comfortable middle class lives when we finish post-secondary school there shouldn’t be as big of a demand for affordable housing units or a dependence on an increased minimum wage just to get by. When more people have good jobs the economy does better, companies do better and their employees benefit.  Socials Mind Map

 

 

After comparing the 4 main political party’s platforms I believe that the conservative party is the best match to my political narrative. They have a specific focus on jobs, growth and long-term prosperity and when it comes to trades they already have a program in place to pay up to $5000 to help people receive the training they need for their jobs. Additionally, they also have a small business tax credit that supports and promotes small or possibly start-up businesses. The Conservative’s opposition criticize them for “giving tax breaks to major corporations”; however, major corporations and big businesses need to be doing well to hire more young Canadians who are looking for jobs.  Other parties like the NDP and Green mention investing in and promoting the growth of the clean energy sector but I do not believe this isn’t a very viable and probably very expensive approach to creating more jobs which would in the end cancel itself out.  In the end the well-being of a country’s economy effects the well-being of its citizens, for this reason I believe that political parties shouldn’t be “helping” the middle class and people trying to reach it with tax breaks. Instead they should create more jobs and in turn a stronger economy and help Canadians help themselves.

By

European Interactions With First Nations Canada vs New Zealand

After discussing residential schools, reserves and treaties in class I am obviously upset about this part of our country’s history but above anything else I’m sad about the knowledge and culture that was lost. Children were taken from their families and placed in residential schools, forced to disassociate from their culture and were subject to awful physical and mental abuse that we do not even the full extent of to this day. For years this created generations of aboriginal youth who didn’t know what growing up in a loving family was like and didn’t know how to create one themselves. In my opinion the creation of reserves only added to the problem. By forcing first nations onto poor farming and hunting land, they were unable to do what they had been doing for thousands of years before European settlers arrived. The fact that they had to register as an “Indian” and stay on the reserves in order to collect yearly compensation from the government to stay alive, they were trapped in a viscous cycle and further isolated. The past attempts of the Canadian government to force first nations into rejecting their traditions and conforming to the European way of life has only created a broken culture with deep scars and gaps of lost knowledge.

 

This issue relates to the interactions between Columbus and Cortes and the aboriginal people of the Americas that we discussed in social studies last year and it shares many similarities. One of these similarities is the “superior” Eurocentric mindset of European explorers and their hoarding attitude towards resources. Additionally, the issue with oral versus written language is at play. In most conflicts throughout the course of history, the group that has a better writing and recording system “wins” in terms of history books. Their story is what we hear so in many cases it is what we believe.

 

The British Empire specifically has a history of not treating the native people of their colonies very well; however, their interactions with the Maori people of New Zealand happened during a similar time period as their interactions with the first nations of Canada and have two very different outcomes.  I want to look at the differences between European interactions with Canadian first nations and New Zealand first nations because although there are a lot of similarities there are a few differences I have identified and I think they account for the difference in aboriginal interactions to this day. What happened in New Zealand that didn’t happen here, what didn’t happen in New Zealand that happened here? Is there anything we can learn that we could apply to help improve modern day interactions in Canada? By pursuing these questions and this topic, I believe I’ll touch on a variety of PLOs including A1, A2, A3, B1, D1, D2 and D3.

 

 

After talking to some of my friends from New Zealand, they have told me that they learn Maori as a second language in school and that news broadcasts and day to day conversations use Maori words and phrases. There is also still a great level of respect for Maori elders and chiefs and you must ask special permission of the chiefs in order to learn and perform the Haka. This initial amount of information paints a drastically different picture when compared to my own experience in Canada. I have also done some research on the topic and found that Europeans arrived in New Zealand in the 17th century and had good relations with the Maori, co-existing until about 1860 when tensions over land sales led to conflict between the Maori (native New Zealanders) and the Pakeha (European New Zealanders).  Due to disease and conflict the Maori population went into a decline, similar to the first nations in Canada; however, by the start of the 20th century it began to recover and the government made efforts to increase the Maori standing in New Zealand Society. Now the Maori are the second largest ethnic group in New Zealand only second to the Pakeha.

By

In-Depth Post #7 2015

One instance in which I shared a feeling or emotion with my mentor was at the beginning of a conversation when I explained to her why I wanted to learn ASL. I want to learn ASL because I believe it will prove to be an in demand and useful skill to have in my possible future careers of which I am very passionate and interested in. By talking about how I believe ASL will help me if I work as a lifeguard, summer camp leader or with people in general, I shared my passion and interests. Another situation where I shared a feeling or emotion with my mentor was at the end of a conversation was when I thanked her for her time and for helping me with my project. I shared my feelings of gratitude and continued interest in the topic and I also shared my respect towards her and her own feelings and emotions.

 

For both of these situations I used different criteria to decide how to share my feelings or emotions. When sharing feelings or emotions at the beginning of a conversation I am somewhat reserved especially when talking with someone I do not know very well. I will not share my opinion to the full extent in order to prevent immediate conflict if the other person’s opinion differs; however, I will share my opinion enough to make it known and strong enough for the other person to agree with if they choose to. When sharing feelings or emotions at the end of a conversation I can usually shape my delivery and the strength of my opinion based on the personality of the person and how well I know them. I am usually able to pick up on what are sensitive topics for certain people and people’s own values or opinions while talking with them. I also always attempt to end my conversations with people on a positive, if not positive as possible note. Sometimes this means summarizing my views and feelings towards a topic while communicating that I have listened to their opinions as well, other times this means agreeing with people and thanking them for their addition to my knowledge and helping me develop an even greater understanding and more specific feeling towards a topic.

 

Diversion is a natural part of conversations and it is how some of the best ideas throughout history have been formed. By having a conversation with others who have lived different lives and had different experiences than you, you can form new connections and develop greater understanding. One example of a diversion in the conversation I had with my mentor is when she talked about going to a ASL party where no one was allowed to speak English, this was a tangent from the conversation but it was interesting and it helped me realize how hard it would be for someone like myself who has limited or developing ASL skills to communicate. There have been many natural diversions in the conversations I have had with my mentor, she is extremely knowledgeable and passionate about ASL and it is an important part of her life. For these reasons she will often go on tangents from the conversation and talk about her experiences; however, this is not a bad thing at all because of these diversions in conversations I developed a more personal and meaningful understanding of the general topic.

By

Social Studies Mid Term

See Prezi for documents of learning

My participation and proficiency in the TALONS Socials Canada from 1815-1914 Unit, to date, is very good. I am effective member of the class and I believe that I positively contribute to the learning environment. I have a thorough understanding of the material covered in class and I have met all the PLOs in regards to this information. I have a good understanding of the differences in the lives and cultures of people in various ethnic groups, how these groups interacted with one another and the structure of the Canadian government pre, during and post confederation. I also have an in-depth understanding of the life of Sir Alexander Campbell and the lives of people who shared his place in society in terms of gender, race and class. At this point in time, I believe I have thoroughly met the Prescribed learning Outcomes A1-A3, I would like to improve my understanding of the Prescribed Learning Outcomes B1-B4 and I am fully meeting or exceeding in the areas of engagement and participation, documents of learning, reflections and summative assessments.

 

The PLO A1 is classified as applying critical thinking skills, including: questioning, comparing, summarizing, drawing conclusions and defending a position. My proficiency in this area can be shown by my ability to defend the position of my character, Sir Alexander Campbell, during role plays based on the research I conducted in terms of his political views, upbringing, race and class. During the role plays I developed ideas for scenes that would showcase my character and interest group’s values and political positions. I also contributed to the development and implementation of the conflict scene between Alexander Campbell and John A. Macdonald set in 1861 that James and I presented in front of the class.  I referenced the Trent Affair in America and its possible consequences and implications towards Canada, both as a British Colony and as a United Dominion. I also made my character hesitant towards drastic changes in order to achieve confederation. I did this to highlight the fact that white, land owning, educated males of British decent were already well off before confederation and in the general time period. Compared to other ethnic groups and cultures they were the least oppressed and usually the highest members of society, this means that they would’ve had a long way to fall if confederation went sideways.

 

The PLO A2 is defined as the ability to demonstrate effective research skills, including: accessing information, assessing information, collecting data, evaluating data, organizing information, presenting information and citing resources. My proficiency in this area can be shown by the fact that my resources submitted to the class CRAAP test were rated green and that I also CRAAP tested for the resources I used to write my blog posts, role play scenes and final address. Additionally, I found and shared a resource on twitter for my interest group to read that was later shared with everyone in class as an informative reading material. My blog post where I shared a library of resources screened against the ministry PLOs I found was also retweeted by @talonsblog. Over the course of the unit so far I have made an effort to access primary source documents including political cartoons, pictures and documents from the archive of Canada.

 

The PLO A3 is defined as the ability to demonstrate effective written, oral and graphic communication skills individually and collaboratively. My proficiency in this area is shown in my participation in role plays, my final address and my personal notes relating to topics covered in class. I believe I was successful in terms of communicating my characters values and opinions within the role play scenes and specifically my final address where I highlighted the difference in the difficulties my character faced throughout his life compared to the difficulties of people of other minority groups or classes. My role play blog posts were focused on a specific and strategically chosen event within Sir Alexander Campbell’s life in order to communicate and show a progression of his personality traits, values and political attitude. In terms of graphic communication, I enjoy taking notes and making charts and maps in order to cement my ideas.  Over the course of the Unit I took a lot of notes and drew many maps and charts to demonstrate intricate ideas and provide resources for myself to look back on.

 

I would like to develop a more complete and thorough understanding of the Prescribed Learning Outcomes B1-B4 relating to the identity, society and culture of Canada from 1815-1914. Although parts of these PLOs have been discussed or referenced in class, I would like to know more about these PLOs so I can make connections and create more educated conclusions. Specifically, I would like to know more about the interactions between the Aboriginal Peoples and European explorers in post confederation Canada and during the expansion of Canada towards the west. I am also intrigued by the influence of immigration on Canadian society and how it has shaped the Canada we live in today in terms of our shared identity and culture. I believe that investigating these topics further will help me answer the questions “where have we been?” and “where are we going?” that were raised at the beginning of the unit. Finally, I am also interested in the impact of technological advancements and artists on Canadian culture.

 

In terms of my overall engagement and participation, documents of learning, reflections and projects and tests, I believe I am fully meeting all requirements.

 

I will be the first to admit that I am not very twitter savvy; however, I made and was mentioned in a few good quality tweets where I shared useful resources with my classmates. In the end my lack of tweets was made up for by my in class participation, my sharing of helpful resources and my participation in role play scenes. I was involved in every class discussion and helped clarify ideas and offered my opinions on topics that I discussed with my peers. Additionally, I have been participating in committee work within TALONS and within my band which shares many parallels to the structure of a democratic government and the process of decision making and conflict resolution that occurs within this type of government.

 

I have many thoughtful and useful documents of learning that I put a considerable amount of effort into during the course of the socials unit. They are of various media including my paper notes, my electronic blog posts and my spoken final address. I take notes on a regular basis and I believe that they are like sub or supporting documents of learning in the sense that they help me produce higher quality blog posts, help me draw connections between events and cement important ideas or concepts.

 

When it comes to summative assessments and reflections I like to group them into the same category because I believe that they lead to a similar, if not the same, end product. Summative assessments or tests, like a thoughtful and honest reflection, will give you an answer to the basic questions “What do I know or understand?” and “what do I need to improve on or learn more about?” Both are, in my opinion, effective forms of assessment and necessary in the education system as it is now. In terms of my own reflection and performance in regards to summative assessments throughout this unit, I believe this social studies midterm assignment, in conjunction with my blog posts and in class role play, is a prime example of my reflection abilities and a good piece of work to be assessed or graded. For this assignment I am reflecting on my own performance compared to the guidelines provided by the Ministry of Education, what I was able to grasp and what I would like to learn more about. Most importantly I am also reflecting on how I developed an understanding of concepts, why they are important concepts and what I still strive to understand.

 

By

Sir Alexander Campbell: Final Address

While writing the final address for my character Sir Alexander Campbell: a lawyer, politician and father of confederation, I wanted to highlight Campbell’s accomplishments and touch on his life after Confederation as well as look into the issue of class, race and gender and how they effected peoples lives during the confederation of Canadian. By portraying an educated, land owning, white male in the Confederation role play I had far fewer challenges and hardships to face when compared to the majority of the population. While some people’s characters were struggling to stay alive, characters like my own were squabbling over fancy titles and partying at diplomatic conferences. By focusing on problems that are quite superficial and ego related in my final address, I hope the audience was able to see the extreme divide created by race, class and gender.

March 1864 was the highest and lowest point in my political career and quite possibly my life. After being underestimated for my entire career as a politician and forced to ride on the coat tails of “greater men”, I finally had my chance, the moment I deserved and had been hoping for since I was young. Every man, woman and child in the new Canada would know my name. Sandfield and Dorion’s coalition government fell apart and I was the obvious next choice to replace them. So I wasn’t surprised when Governor General Monck asked me to try and create a better one. I was going to be the driving force behind confederation, the father of confederation. I was going to be the best, not friends with the best or working for the best. The best. But, in a matter of days it was over and before I knew it Macdonald and his new buddy Tache had taken my place, my legacy. It just is not fair, why is my life plagued by struggles and injustices like this? During confederation I was pushed to the side and forced to watch my only real chance to become a major political leader slip through my fingers. I got an education. I am a well off land-owner who comes from an influential family; yet no one ever gives me enough of a chance. They never believe in me.   It’s been a year since confederation now and all I’ve got is a cushy job in the senate and people treating me like a cushy man with no backbone who couldn’t stand up for his country or himself.

By

Sir Alexander Campbell – December 27th 1861

December 27th, 1861

 

I received a letter from MacDonald today, he returned from his campaign and speaking tour as leader of the Upper Canada Conservative Party a few weeks back and now it seems he is trying to form a new cabinet. He has asked me if I would take office; however, I must admit I am reluctant to do so. MacDonald is a good lawyer, he was a great business partner and he has been quite successful buying and selling land; but, when it comes to politics he’s never been very popular. He is calling for a British North American Federation in the hopes that the Province of Canada, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia will form a dominion with a constitution similar in principle to that of the United Kingdom.

 

In my opinion this is mad. The British, the French and the people of the Maritimes can barely get along as it is. How could amalgamating everyone into a single dominion make this situation better? If we were meant to be some grand unified country don’t you think we would be already?

 

The only thing that could possibly be working in his favour for this misguided scheme is what the press is now calling the ‘Trent Affair’. Our neighbours the Americans have become divided and engaged in a war with themselves or what some are calling a ‘civil war’ and this may be the only thing that could possibly work in favour of MacDonald’s misguided scheme.

There has been a massive increase in the British Military’s presence in the Maratimes since the Trent Affair.

About a month back, a British packet steamer called the Trent was stopped by an American warship and two confederate diplomats were taken to Boston as prisoners. After such a blatantly obvious rejection of diplomacy, I’m sure that I am not the only one who sees the potential for an Anglo-Northern war if this tension between the British and the Americans continues. If war spread north, our young colonies would be destroyed. We have no great military power and I fear that a fight for our land and allegiance between the British and the Americans would leave us even more divided than we are today.

 

Although the French have acted out in the past, I truly believe that no one here wants war and for this reason a unified dominion with British ties might be the best choice.  I think I’ll support MacDonald, so long as he also asks Street and Cameron, at least that way we’ll have some clear heads in the cabinet.

 

By

In-Depth Post #6 2015

I had a fair amount of trouble finding a mentor at the beginning of my project, and during the time I was searching for a mentor I had to turn to some alternative methods for learning ASL including online tutorials, apps and YouTube videos. In terms of online tutorials, my mentor has recommended some alternative resources for me to look into that I wouldn’t have ever known existed. There are actually ASL music videos of popular songs and the actors in the music videos are signing the lyrics to the song and there is also the song playing in the background. This helps me identify new words and remember phrases; it is also a fun alternative to a plain tutorial.  When reflecting on my project so far I think that one possible alternative for conducting my project and what I may do in the future when I have more free time would be to register for an ASL class.

 

In terms of practical ideas and concepts; I feel as though American Sign Language is a practical idea within the concept of communication and within ASL there are many important concepts to grasp. One of the concepts that I believe is important to grasp while learning to have conversations in ASL, and that I am currently working on, is understanding the other person you are conversing with. Understanding ASL is a broad concept and within this concept there are many practical ideas and techniques that when combined can help you. The first and main one is to build and become familiar with your vocabulary, so far I have been working on increasing my vocabulary by watching online tutorials. Another way is to understand the meaning or tone while conversing in ASL by paying attention to a person’s facial expressions and body language. In ASL, facial expressions and body language are a far greater part of communication than in spoken language. The final way to work towards understanding ASL is to read peoples lips, some people will mouth the words they are signing; however, not everyone does this.

 

 

 

By

Sir Alexander Campbell – October 23rd 1839

October 23rd 1839

I still can’t believe old Henry Cassady is dead. He was a truly kind soul and my only regret is that I never properly thanked him for taking me on as a law student in his last years. It is odd how a death of a dear friend can make you realize how good your own life really is, many people have told me that I have received an unusually good education and I would have to agree. I hate to admit it but I am not really very smart or influential I have just been lucky to have other people who are, carry me on their shoulders. I am a man of seventeen years now and I believe that it is time for me to make a name for myself, I want to carve my own path and make my parents proud of me and the decision they made to come to this new land. Yet once again I am lucky. Mr. Macdonald, another lawyer in town who already has a law student named Oliver Mowat and is only 7 years my senior, has offered to take me on as a student at his practice in light of Cassady’s death . I have heard a lot about Mr. Macdonald and all his accomplishments. People around here say he will go on to do great things and there is also a rumor that he may go into politics. I’m glad that Mr. Macdonald has given me the opportunity to continue my studies in law and prepare for being called to the bar but I won’t let him give me an easy ride. In a few more years and I’ll be a lawyer and then I’ll be able to make my mark in the history books. I don’t want to be a right hand man or a supporter; I don’t want to spend my life chasing dreams that are not my own.

css.php